Skip to content

Exhibition closed

We're open Monday – Thursday 10am – 4pm & Sundays 11am – 3.30pm

Dachau

Dachau was the first Nazi concentration camp established in March 1933. It was initially intended to hold political prisoners and opponents of the Nazi regime, but quickly expanded to include others, such as homosexuals and those considered ‘asocial’. Few Jews were imprisoned there in the early stages of camp operations. The camp expanded in 1937 and, following the events of Kristallnacht, 11,000 Jewish men were interned there. During the war, those interned at Dachau were used as forced labour for the war effort, including in its 140 subcamps. At least 28,000 people died at Dachau from 1933 to 1945.